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Clove was once at the center of the global spice trade and remains an important and well-used spice today. Popular in Middle Eastern, north African, Chinese, and Indian cuisines, cloves also have a history of use in Ayurvedic and traditional Chinese medicine practices. Ground cloves are valued for their stimulating aromatics and can be added to seasoning blends, coffee, tea, mulled wine, baked goods, extracts, and more.

 

An extensively utilized culinary spice since ancient times, clove rivals other well-known spices such as cinnamon, ginger, and nutmeg for popularity. Clove is used in liqueurs and mulled wine, perfumes and even love potions. More recently, clove oil has been employed for its analgesic effects in dentistry.

 

Clove is a small evergreen tree with smooth gray bark and large, bright green, aromatic and lanceolate shaped leaves. The flowers grow in yellow to bright red clusters at the end of branches. It is in the Myrtaceae family, with relatives ranging from guava to allspice to eucalyptus. The clove of commerce is the pink or reddish flower bud that turns dark brown when dried. The entire tree is highly aromatic and its Latin specific name aromaticum, refers to this intense aroma. The generic name Syzygium is based on the Greek word 'syzygos', that means 'paired or joined' and is in reference to the petals which are joined. The common name 'clove,' a derivative of the Latin 'clavus' meaning 'nail,' and refers to the shape of the clove. Clove is native to the Maluku or Molucca Islands (often referred to as the Spice Islands, due, in part, to the abundance of clove) in Indonesia.

 

Traditionally, in the Molucca Islands, a clove tree was planted each time a child was born leading to the abundance of this spice. Various folk tales and myths surround clove as it was believed to be imbued with the magical powers of protection, love, and, burned as incense to attract financial abundance. Further, it was thought that burning it as incense would stop others from gossiping about you. Additionally, it was used in exorcisms to expel evil spirits.

 

In Ayurveda (system of traditional healing in India), clove, referred to as 'lavanga,' has not only been used in the kitchen, but has been employed as a medicinal herb to support digestion, soothe nausea, to support lung health, and is thought to be a highly effective carminative. It is considered to be an energetically hot herb having a pungent taste and therefore most useful in cold or stagnant conditions. Likewise, in TCM (Traditional Chinese Medicine), clove is considered a warming herb that breaks up stagnant energy by encouraging chi (energy) flow, and is used to support the kidney, spleen, and stomach meridians.

 

The main component in the volatile oil is eugenol (cinnamon also contains high levels of this constituent) thought to be responsible for clove's analgesic effects.

 

Cloves are highly aromatic and pungent. Heating. Dried flower buds powdered as a culinary spice or as part of a tea blend.

 

Precautions
Consumption should not exceed small amounts for use as a spice. Consult a qualified healthcare practitioner before using in therapeutic doses. We recommend that you consult with a qualified healthcare practitioner before using herbal products, particularly if you are pregnant, nursing, or on any medications.

 

This information has not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. For educational purposes only.

Clove Powder (Organic) 1 oz

$4.00Price
  • Clove Powder, Organic.

    Origin: sri lanka

    Plant parts used: flower buds, leaves and stems

    Processing: Powder

    Agriculture: Organic

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